steven kowalski photography
the fallen empire
model: berkley clayborne
photography by Steven Kowalski

the fallen empire

model: berkley clayborne

photography by Steven Kowalski

no one can save us

no one can save us

fashion
model: shari mocheit

fashion

model: shari mocheit

my wife’s 83-year-old grandmother.  true beauty.

my wife’s 83-year-old grandmother.  true beauty.

A Better Time
Steven Kowalski Photography ( Tumblr | Facebook | Website )

A Better Time

Steven Kowalski Photography ( Tumblr | Facebook | Website )

dreaming of ice cream
Steven Kowalski Photography ( Tumblr | Facebook | Website )

dreaming of ice cream

Steven Kowalski Photography ( Tumblr | Facebook | Website )

lolita
Steven Kowalski Photography ( Tumblr | Facebook | Website )

lolita

Steven Kowalski Photography ( Tumblr | Facebook | Website )

hard to get work done when you have this furry thing hangin around all day! 

mary
Steven Kowalski Photography ( Tumblr | Facebook | Website )

mary

Steven Kowalski Photography ( Tumblr | Facebook | Website )

no room for weakness 
(Stoked about the 300 sequel)

no room for weakness 

(Stoked about the 300 sequel)

new headshot
self portrait 7/26/13-2

new headshot

self portrait 7/26/13-2

What is one piece of information you wouldve of liked to of known that you know now about taking pictures when you were still an amateur photographer.
Anonymous

That I should have started putting light sabers in my work way sooner.

In all seriousness, the best advice I could give people is to not rush defining yourself as a professional.  As soon as you pop up a website/facebook page that says <Your Name> Photography, your brand, name, and work become one.  If you feel your work sucks, realize that’s your name/reputation on the line. Furthermore, once you establish yourself as a “professional”, why would any (real) studios hire you when they’d essentially be hiring a (wannabe) competitor.  I’m kind of in that position as we speak.  I’m pushing hard to get into commercial work - but don’t have any experience working at a commercial studio.  The whole idea of getting work on that level is completely foreign to me because I’ve never been an intern. Lastly, if you rush into becoming a “pro” you’ll essentially be forced into a situation where you take gigs that you don’t want to do (assuming you have bills to pay like me).  It’s like training your entire life to be a sushi chef then getting a job at a Greek restaurant. 

Follow me on Facebook, please!! :D

John the Penguin - my first photo project, circa 2007